DNA 101 - Fieldtrip for grades 3-4

Earth is home to a wide variety of living organisms and cells are the basic units of structure and function in living things. What is a cell? What are the differences between unicellular and multicellular organisms? What does a cell look like? 

In this course students start by learning to use a microscope to observe onion skin and human cheek cells. Using paper and pencil, they draw their observations to record what they see through the microscope. We then go outside to the park surrounding the center where each student collects a few biological samples, e.g. leaves and flowers. Returning to the lab, they make a clip-book of their specimens and answer questions such as whether their specimen is unicellular or multicellular and whether it contains DNA. We encourage students to ponder a few important questions - What is DNA? Do all living things have DNA? Where is the DNA? How can DNA encode all biological information including our physical appearance? 

Students then examine and record personal physical features, such as dimples or bent little fingers, and test their bitter-tasting ability. Through hands-on engagement, students discover the link between genotype (DNA) and phenotype (physical traits). 

This introductory fieldtrip combines what a child observes in the world around them with their naked eyes and what they see through a microscope. Students have the opportunity to participate in both lab and outdoor activities to discover the fundamental basis of biology. It is a first introduction to the concepts that all living organisms are made of cells, all living organisms have DNA and that DNA is the underlying material which makes us each unique. 

 


DNA 101 - Fieldtrip for grades 3-4

Earth is home to a wide variety of living organisms and cells are the basic units of structure and function in living things. What is a cell? What are the differences between unicellular and multicellular organisms? What does a cell look like? 

In this course students start by learning to use a microscope to observe onion skin and human cheek cells. Using paper and pencil, they draw their observations to record what they see through the microscope. We then go outside to the park surrounding the center where each student collects a few biological samples, e.g. leaves and flowers. Returning to the lab, they make a clip-book of their specimens and answer questions such as whether their specimen is unicellular or multicellular and whether it contains DNA. We encourage students to ponder a few important questions - What is DNA? Do all living things have DNA? Where is the DNA? How can DNA encode all biological information including our physical appearance? 

Students then examine and record personal physical features, such as dimples or bent little fingers, and test their bitter-tasting ability. Through hands-on engagement, students discover the link between genotype (DNA) and phenotype (physical traits). 

This introductory fieldtrip combines what a child observes in the world around them with their naked eyes and what they see through a microscope. Students have the opportunity to participate in both lab and outdoor activities to discover the fundamental basis of biology. It is a first introduction to the concepts that all living organisms are made of cells, all living organisms have DNA and that DNA is the underlying material which makes us each unique. 

 


DNA 101 - Fieldtrip for grades 3-4

Earth is home to a wide variety of living organisms and cells are the basic units of structure and function in living things. What is a cell? What are the differences between unicellular and multicellular organisms? What does a cell look like? 

In this course students start by learning to use a microscope to observe onion skin and human cheek cells. Using paper and pencil, they draw their observations to record what they see through the microscope. We then go outside to the park surrounding the center where each student collects a few biological samples, e.g. leaves and flowers. Returning to the lab, they make a clip-book of their specimens and answer questions such as whether their specimen is unicellular or multicellular and whether it contains DNA. We encourage students to ponder a few important questions - What is DNA? Do all living things have DNA? Where is the DNA? How can DNA encode all biological information including our physical appearance? 

Students then examine and record personal physical features, such as dimples or bent little fingers, and test their bitter-tasting ability. Through hands-on engagement, students discover the link between genotype (DNA) and phenotype (physical traits). 

This introductory fieldtrip combines what a child observes in the world around them with their naked eyes and what they see through a microscope. Students have the opportunity to participate in both lab and outdoor activities to discover the fundamental basis of biology. It is a first introduction to the concepts that all living organisms are made of cells, all living organisms have DNA and that DNA is the underlying material which makes us each unique.